How can you write an open access encyclopedia in a closed access world?

Event Details

How can you write an open access encyclopedia in a closed access world?

Time: October 28, 2015 from 6pm to 8pm
Country: United States of America
Street: 149 New Montgomery St.
City/Town: San Francisco
Website or Map: https://www.google.com/maps/p…
Phone: +1 503-383-9454
Event Type: panel, discussion/webinar
Organized By: Pete Forsyth
Latest Activity: Oct 10, 2015

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Event Description

See blog post for info & registration

Much knowledge has always been locked away, throughout history. It’s inaccessible — or expensive to access — for all but a privileged few.

Two Internet-era social movements have sought to change that: Wikipedia, which invites any and all to participate in constructing a comprehensive encyclopedia; and the Open Access movement, which maintains that academic research — especially when funded by the public — should be readily accessible to the public, ideally under free licenses that permit virtually unrestricted redistribution.

The goals, tactics, and even communities of both movements overlap strongly. But on occasion, conflicts arise. Last month, Open Access advocate Michael Eisen took issue with the activities of The Wikipedia Library, a project which aims to help Wikipedia’s volunteer editors read and consult otherwise inaccessible publications (typically, academic journals). His critiques were covered in Ars Technica, and various blog posts and social media postings ensued.

Conflicting views on how to engage with closed-access publishers present an opportunity to discuss the goals and visions of both movements. With that in mind, we invite you to attend (either in person or via webinar) a panel discussion on Wednesday, October 28. We will delve deeper into these issues, and invite discussion and commentary.

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