Open Access Week

October 19 - 25, 2020 | Everywhere

Open Access Week @ University of British Columbia

http://oaweek.scholcomm.ubc.ca/

UBC’s own event – Open Access Week @ UBC – showcases a week of topical discussion panels, lectures and workshops highlighting diverse areas of open scholarship from UBC’s researchers, faculty, students, staff and special guests and ends with concluding remarks from Dr. David Farrar, Provost and Vice President Academic.

Some of the many evocative talks scheduled include:

o Sayeed Choudhury from Johns Hopkins (JHU), our keynote event, who will talk about The Case for Open Data and eScience – Establishing a University Data Management Program at Johns Hopkins.

o Martha Rans, Creative Commons lawyer and Legal Director of the Artists Legal Outreach at the Alliance for Arts who will describe What Bill C-32 Means to Educators.

o Dr. Anita Palepu who will be talking about Choosing to be an Open Access Journal Publisher.

o Dr. Heather Piwowar will describe her research on data sharing and re-use behaviour and What it means to make raw research datasets open?

o Dr. John Willinsky, founder of the Public Knowledge Project, and graduate students Meike Wernicke and ReillyYeo will be talking about Scholarly Rights and Responsibilities in the Digital Age.

o UBC students Goldis Chami and Gordana Panic will be talking about their work igniting student support for open access at UBC.

o Professor Michael Brauer will describe the development of his award winning Cycling Route Planner, an openly available web tool to support public health.

All of these events are FREE and open to the public, students, faculty, staff and schools

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